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A Capitol worker arranges barricades ...
Data da imagem: 03/01/2019
Cod. da imagem: ny040119135604
Crédito: Sarah Silbiger/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

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A Capitol worker arranges barricades before the 116th Congress was sworn in, during the partial government shutdown, in Washington.

Data da imagem: 03/01/2019

Cod. da imagem: ny040119135604

A Capitol worker arranges barricades before the 116th Congress was sworn in, during the partial government shutdown, in Washington.

Crédito: Sarah Silbiger/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

A Capitol worker arranges barricades before the 116th Congress was sworn in, during the partial government shutdown, in Washington, Jan. 3, 2019. Democrats believe President Donald Trump has boxed himself in with his demand for money for a border wall that they consider ill advised and publicly unpopular. (Sarah Silbiger/The New York Times/Fotoarena)

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Sen. Roy Blunt (R-Mo.) talks to ...
Data da imagem: 12/12/2018
Cod. da imagem: ny130119183504
Crédito: Erin Schaff/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

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Sen. Roy Blunt (R-Mo.) talks to reporters on Capitol Hill in Washington.

Data da imagem: 12/12/2018

Cod. da imagem: ny130119183504

Sen. Roy Blunt (R-Mo.) talks to reporters on Capitol Hill in Washington.

Crédito: Erin Schaff/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

FILE -- Sen. Roy Blunt (R-Mo.) talks to reporters on Capitol Hill in Washington, Dec. 12, 2018. Blunt, the chairman of the Senate Rules Committee, said he was open to a rules change that would allow photography in the Senate for special occasions, such as the opening of a new Congress. (Erin Schaff/The New York Times/Fotoarena)

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Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell ...
Data da imagem: 11/12/2018
Cod. da imagem: ny131218132405
Crédito: Erin Schaff/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

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Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) holds a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington.

Data da imagem: 11/12/2018

Cod. da imagem: ny131218132405

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) holds a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington.

Crédito: Erin Schaff/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) holds a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Dec. 11, 2018. The Republican leader resisted a criminal justice debate for years, but he relented under an immense show of support for the legislation. (Erin Schaff/The New York Times/Fotoarena)

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President Donald Trump and Vice ...
Data da imagem: 11/12/2018
Cod. da imagem: ny121218124004
Crédito: Doug Mills/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

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President Donald Trump and Vice President Mike Pence meet with House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) at the White House in Washington.

Data da imagem: 11/12/2018

Cod. da imagem: ny121218124004

President Donald Trump and Vice President Mike Pence meet with House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) at the White House in Washington.

Crédito: Doug Mills/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

President Donald Trump and Vice President Mike Pence meet with House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) at the White House in Washington, Dec. 11, 2018. In a new twist on the old game of shutdown politics dating to the 1990s, Trump was essentially goaded on Tuesday by Pelosi and Schumer of into embracing ownership of a shutdown yet to come if Democrats do not accede to his request for $5 billion to build a wall on the southern border with Mexico. (Doug Mills/The New York Times/Fotoarena)

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President Donald Trump meets with ...
Data da imagem: 11/12/2018
Cod. da imagem: ny121218235004
Crédito: Doug Mills/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

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President Donald Trump meets with Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) at the White House in Washington.

Data da imagem: 11/12/2018

Cod. da imagem: ny121218235004

President Donald Trump meets with Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) at the White House in Washington.

Crédito: Doug Mills/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

President Donald Trump meets with Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) at the White House in Washington, Dec. 11, 2018. In a new twist on the old game of shutdown politics dating to the 1990s, Trump was essentially goaded on Tuesday by Pelosi and Schumer of into embracing ownership of a shutdown yet to come if Democrats do not accede to his request for $5 billion to build a wall on the southern border with Mexico. (Doug Mills/The New York Times/Fotoarena)

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An honor guard stands watch as former ...
Data da imagem: 04/12/2018
Cod. da imagem: ny041218232504
Crédito: Erin Schaff/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

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An honor guard stands watch as former President George H.W. Bush lies in state at the Capitol Rotunda in Washington.

Data da imagem: 04/12/2018

Cod. da imagem: ny041218232504

An honor guard stands watch as former President George H.W. Bush lies in state at the Capitol Rotunda in Washington.

Crédito: Erin Schaff/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

An honor guard stands watch as former President George H.W. Bush lies in state at the Capitol Rotunda in Washington, Dec. 4, 2018. Presidential funerals provide a moment for Washington ? and the nation ? to pause and embrace the better side of our politics. (Erin Schaff/The New York Times/Fotoarena)

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Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell ...
Data da imagem: 06/10/2018
Cod. da imagem: ny071018174303
Crédito: Erin Schaff/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

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Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) speaks at a news conference after the vote to confirm Judge Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court on Capitol Hill in Washington.

Data da imagem: 06/10/2018

Cod. da imagem: ny071018174303

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) speaks at a news conference after the vote to confirm Judge Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court on Capitol Hill in Washington.

Crédito: Erin Schaff/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) speaks at a news conference after the vote to confirm Judge Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court on Capitol Hill in Washington, Oct. 6, 2018. The confirmation process of Justice Kavanaugh entered new territory from the beginning, and senators from both parties fear lasting institutional damage. (Erin Schaff/The New York Times/Fotoarena)

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A staff aide on Capitol Hill in ...
Data da imagem: 06/10/2018
Cod. da imagem: ny181018201303
Crédito: Erin Schaff/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

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A staff aide on Capitol Hill in Washington.

Data da imagem: 06/10/2018

Cod. da imagem: ny181018201303

A staff aide on Capitol Hill in Washington.

Crédito: Erin Schaff/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

FILE -- A staff aide on Capitol Hill in Washington, Oct. 6, 2018. Once a comfortable landing spot for retiring and defeated members of Congress seeking to keep their hand in federal affairs and be paid well to do so, the trade groups that represent the nation?s businesses, industries and professions in the nation?s capital are, as they say, moving in a different direction. (Erin Schaff/The New York Times/Fotoarena)

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Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell ...
Data da imagem: 28/09/2018
Cod. da imagem: ny300918191704
Crédito: Tom Brenner/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

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Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) walks with reporters to his office on Capitol Hill in Washington.

Data da imagem: 28/09/2018

Cod. da imagem: ny300918191704

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) walks with reporters to his office on Capitol Hill in Washington.

Crédito: Tom Brenner/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) walks with reporters to his office on Capitol Hill in Washington, Sept. 28, 2018. The last-minute decision by Sen. Jeff Flake (R-Ariz.) to force an extended FBI investigation of Judge Brett Kavanaugh wasn?t what McConnell and most Republicans wanted, but it could end up easing the way for the nominee?s Supreme Court confirmation, columnist Carl Hulse says. (Tom Brenner/The New York Times/Fotoarena)

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Sen. Jeff Flake (R-Ariz.) at a ...
Data da imagem: 28/09/2018
Cod. da imagem: ny300918191504
Crédito: Erin Schaff/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

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Sen. Jeff Flake (R-Ariz.) at a Judiciary Committee executive session before taking a vote to move Judge Brett Kavanaugh’s nomination to the Supreme Court out of committee, on Capitol Hill in ...

Data da imagem: 28/09/2018

Cod. da imagem: ny300918191504

Sen. Jeff Flake (R-Ariz.) at a Judiciary Committee executive session before taking a vote to move Judge Brett Kavanaugh’s nomination to the Supreme Court out of committee, on Capitol Hill in Washington.

Crédito: Erin Schaff/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

Sen. Jeff Flake (R-Ariz.) at a Judiciary Committee executive session before taking a vote to move Judge Brett Kavanaugh?s nomination to the Supreme Court out of committee, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Sept. 28, 2018. Flake?s last-minute decision to force an extended FBI investigation of Kavanaugh wasn?t what most Republicans wanted, but it could end up easing the way for the nominee?s Supreme Court confirmation, columnist Carl Hulse says. (Erin Schaff/The New York Times/Fotoarena)

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Sen. Dick Durbin (D-Ill.) returns to a ...
Data da imagem: 28/09/2018
Cod. da imagem: ny071018173903
Crédito: Erin Schaff/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

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Sen. Dick Durbin (D-Ill.) returns to a Senate Judiciary Committee executive session meeting on Capitol Hill in Washington

Data da imagem: 28/09/2018

Cod. da imagem: ny071018173903

Sen. Dick Durbin (D-Ill.) returns to a Senate Judiciary Committee executive session meeting on Capitol Hill in Washington

Crédito: Erin Schaff/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

Sen. Dick Durbin (D-Ill.) returns to a Senate Judiciary Committee executive session meeting on Capitol Hill in Washington, Sept. 28, 2018. The confirmation process of Justice Kavanaugh entered new territory from the beginning, and senators from both parties fear lasting institutional damage. (Erin Schaff/The New York Times/Fotoarena)

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Judge Brett Kavanaugh testifies before ...
Data da imagem: 27/09/2018
Cod. da imagem: ny251118203504
Crédito: Gabriella Demczuk/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

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Judge Brett Kavanaugh testifies before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington in September 2018.

Data da imagem: 27/09/2018

Cod. da imagem: ny251118203504

Judge Brett Kavanaugh testifies before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington in September 2018.

Crédito: Gabriella Demczuk/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

FILE ? Judge Brett Kavanaugh testifies before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington, Sept. 27, 2018. Republicans saw the poisonous fight over Kavanaugh?s confirmation to the U.S. Supreme Court as pure gold in the midterm elections, calling it ?Kavanaugh?s Revenge,? but Democrats say the fight did little damage and helped them seize control of the House. (Gabriella Demczuk/The New York Times/Fotoarena)

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Republican senators listen as ...
Data da imagem: 27/09/2018
Cod. da imagem: ny280918162003
Crédito: Gabriella Demczuk/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

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Republican senators listen as Christine Blasey Ford testified before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill.

Data da imagem: 27/09/2018

Cod. da imagem: ny280918162003

Republican senators listen as Christine Blasey Ford testified before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill.

Crédito: Gabriella Demczuk/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

From left: Sens. Mike Lee (R-Utah), John Cornyn (R-Texas), Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.), Orrin Hatch (R-Utah), and Chairman Charles Grassley (R-Iowa) listen as Christine Blasey Ford testified before the Senate Judiciary Committee, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Sept. 27, 2018. Republicans know this may be their last, best opportunity to cement a conservative majority on the Supreme Court for a generation, Carl Hulse writes. (Gabriella Demczuk/The New York Times/Fotoarena)

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House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi ...
Data da imagem: 26/09/2018
Cod. da imagem: ny251018190503
Crédito: Pete Marovich/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

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House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) during a news conference with House Democrats on Capitol Hill in Washington

Data da imagem: 26/09/2018

Cod. da imagem: ny251018190503

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) during a news conference with House Democrats on Capitol Hill in Washington

Crédito: Pete Marovich/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

FILE -- House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) during a news conference with House Democrats on Capitol Hill in Washington, Sept. 26, 2018. It isn?t guaranteed that Pelosi, the current Democratic leader, would be elected speaker even if her party won control of the House. (Pete Marovich/The New York Times/Fotoarena)

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Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell ...
Data da imagem: 25/09/2018
Cod. da imagem: ny071018174104
Crédito: Erin Schaff/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

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Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) speaks at a news conference after the vote to confirm Judge Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court on Capitol Hill in Washington.

Data da imagem: 25/09/2018

Cod. da imagem: ny071018174104

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) speaks at a news conference after the vote to confirm Judge Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court on Capitol Hill in Washington.

Crédito: Erin Schaff/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

FILE -- Sen. Richard Shelby (R-Ala.) speaks to reporters on Capitol Hill in Washington, Sept. 25, 2018. The confirmation process of Justice Kavanaugh entered new territory from the beginning, and senators from both parties fear lasting institutional damage. (Erin Schaff/The New York Times/Fotoarena)

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Chairman Chuck Grassley (R-Iowa) and ...
Data da imagem: 13/09/2018
Cod. da imagem: ny150918143803
Crédito: Erin Schaff/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

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Chairman Chuck Grassley (R-Iowa) and Ranking Member Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) of the Senate Judiciary Committee during an executive business meeting to consider the nomination of Judge Brett ...

Data da imagem: 13/09/2018

Cod. da imagem: ny150918143803

Chairman Chuck Grassley (R-Iowa) and Ranking Member Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) of the Senate Judiciary Committee during an executive business meeting to consider the nomination of Judge Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court on Capitol Hill, in Washington.

Crédito: Erin Schaff/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

Chairman Chuck Grassley (R-Iowa) and Ranking Member Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) of the Senate Judiciary Committee during an executive business meeting to consider the nomination of Judge Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court on Capitol Hill, in Washington, Sept. 13, 2018. A decades-old assault claim, coming a week before the Judiciary Committee is scheduled to vote on Kavanaugh's nomination, did not yet appear to be impeding his steady progress toward assuming a seat on the court this fall. (Erin Schaff/The New York Times/Fotoarena)

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Judge Brett Kavanaugh, President ...
Data da imagem: 06/09/2018
Cod. da imagem: ny250918212104
Crédito: Erin Schaff/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

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Judge Brett Kavanaugh, President Donald Trump's nominee for the Supreme Court, testifies on the third day of his confirmation hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill in ...

Data da imagem: 06/09/2018

Cod. da imagem: ny250918212104

Judge Brett Kavanaugh, President Donald Trump's nominee for the Supreme Court, testifies on the third day of his confirmation hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington.

Crédito: Erin Schaff/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

FILE -- Judge Brett Kavanaugh, President Donald Trump's nominee for the Supreme Court, testifies on the third day of his confirmation hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington, Sept. 6, 2018. Kavanaugh's pluses have become minuses as his time at elite schools has given rise to sexual misconduct claims and his long record in Washington has fueled Democratic distrust, Carl Hulse writes. (Erin Schaff/The New York Times/Fotoarena)

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Sen. Cory Booker (D-N.J.) questions ...
Data da imagem: 05/09/2018
Cod. da imagem: ny070918201203
Crédito: T.j. Kirkpatrick/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

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Sen. Cory Booker (D-N.J.) questions Judge Brett Kavanaugh, President Donald Trump’s nominee for the U.S. Supreme Court, during his confirmation hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee on ...

Data da imagem: 05/09/2018

Cod. da imagem: ny070918201203

Sen. Cory Booker (D-N.J.) questions Judge Brett Kavanaugh, President Donald Trump’s nominee for the U.S. Supreme Court, during his confirmation hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington.

Crédito: T.j. Kirkpatrick/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

Sen. Cory Booker (D-N.J.) questions Judge Brett Kavanaugh, President Donald Trump?s nominee for the U.S. Supreme Court, during his confirmation hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington, Sept. 5, 2018. With few tools to block court nominee, Senate Democrats decide to push the envelope. ?Bring it,? said Booker. (T.J. Kirkpatrick/The New York Times/Fotoarena)

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A protester is escorted out by Capitol ...
Data da imagem: 04/09/2018
Cod. da imagem: ny040918182404
Crédito: Erin Schaff/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

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A protester is escorted out by Capitol Police during a confirmation hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee for Judge Brett Kavanaugh, President Donald Trump’s nominee for the U.S. Supreme ...

Data da imagem: 04/09/2018

Cod. da imagem: ny040918182404

A protester is escorted out by Capitol Police during a confirmation hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee for Judge Brett Kavanaugh, President Donald Trump’s nominee for the U.S. Supreme Court, on Capitol Hill in Washington.

Crédito: Erin Schaff/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

A protester is escorted out by Capitol Police during a confirmation hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee for Judge Brett Kavanaugh, President Donald Trump?s nominee for the U.S. Supreme Court, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Sept. 4, 2018. (Erin Schaff/The New York Times/Fotoarena)

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Judge Brett Kavanaugh, President ...
Data da imagem: 04/09/2018
Cod. da imagem: ny040918182604
Crédito: Erin Schaff/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

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Judge Brett Kavanaugh, President Donald Trump’s nominee for the U.S. Supreme Court, arrives for his confirmation hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill.

Data da imagem: 04/09/2018

Cod. da imagem: ny040918182604

Judge Brett Kavanaugh, President Donald Trump’s nominee for the U.S. Supreme Court, arrives for his confirmation hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill.

Crédito: Erin Schaff/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

Judge Brett Kavanaugh, President Donald Trump?s nominee for the U.S. Supreme Court, arrives for his confirmation hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill, in Washington, Sept. 4, 2018. (Erin Schaff/The New York Times/Fotoarena)

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