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Wis Isotope Plant Adv14

Bags of Molybdenum-99, a lifesaving ...
Data da imagem: 12/01/2018
Cod. da imagem: ny120118180213
Crédito: Jason Henry/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

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Bags of Molybdenum-99, a lifesaving radioisotope, in a hot lab at Stanford University Medical Center’s Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging center in Stanford, Calif.

Data da imagem: 12/01/2018

Cod. da imagem: ny120118180213

Bags of Molybdenum-99, a lifesaving radioisotope, in a hot lab at Stanford University Medical Center’s Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging center in Stanford, Calif.

Crédito: Jason Henry/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

Bags of Molybdenum-99, a lifesaving radioisotope, in a hot lab at Stanford University Medical Center?s Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging center in Stanford, Calif., July 31, 2017. In a daily global race, suppliers seek to deliver to U.S. hospitals the cancer-fighting isotopes as they disappear hour by hour. (Jason Henry/The New York Times/Fotoarena)

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Wis Isotope Plant Adv14

Dr. Andrei Iagaru, chief of the ...
Data da imagem: 12/01/2018
Cod. da imagem: ny120118180412
Crédito: Jason Henry/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

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Dr. Andrei Iagaru, chief of the division of nuclear medicine at Stanford Health Care, in Stanford, Calif.

Data da imagem: 12/01/2018

Cod. da imagem: ny120118180412

Dr. Andrei Iagaru, chief of the division of nuclear medicine at Stanford Health Care, in Stanford, Calif.

Crédito: Jason Henry/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

Dr. Andrei Iagaru, chief of the division of nuclear medicine at Stanford Health Care, in Stanford, Calif., July 31, 2017. Iagaru has said the vulnerability of the supply chain for Molybdenum-99, a lifesaving radioisotope, has led some doctors to shift to more dependable, but more toxic, imaging agents. (Jason Henry/The New York Times/Fotoarena)

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Images of a patient recently injected ...
Data da imagem: 12/01/2018
Cod. da imagem: ny120118180311
Crédito: Jason Henry/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

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Images of a patient recently injected with a dose of Molybdenum-99, a lifesaving radioisotope, at Stanford University Medical Center in Stanford, Calif.

Data da imagem: 12/01/2018

Cod. da imagem: ny120118180311

Images of a patient recently injected with a dose of Molybdenum-99, a lifesaving radioisotope, at Stanford University Medical Center in Stanford, Calif.

Crédito: Jason Henry/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

Images of a patient recently injected with a dose of Molybdenum-99, a lifesaving radioisotope, at Stanford University Medical Center in Stanford, Calif., July 31, 2017. Nuclear medicine imaging runs almost entirely on Molybdenum-99, a radioisotope produced by nuclear fission of enriched uranium that decays so rapidly it becomes worthless within days. (Jason Henry/The New York Times/Fotoarena)

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Nora Gurevich, a nuclear medicine ...
Data da imagem: 02/08/2017
Cod. da imagem: ny120118180112
Crédito: Jason Henry/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

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Nora Gurevich, a nuclear medicine technologist, prepares a dose of Molybdenum-99, a lifesaving radioisotope, at Stanford University Medical Center’s Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging center ...

Data da imagem: 02/08/2017

Cod. da imagem: ny120118180112

Nora Gurevich, a nuclear medicine technologist, prepares a dose of Molybdenum-99, a lifesaving radioisotope, at Stanford University Medical Center’s Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging center in Stanford, Calif.

Crédito: Jason Henry/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

Nora Gurevich, a nuclear medicine technologist, prepares a dose of Molybdenum-99, a lifesaving radioisotope, at Stanford University Medical Center?s Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging center in Stanford, Calif., July 31, 2017. Nuclear medicine imaging runs almost entirely on Molybdenum-99, a radioisotope produced by nuclear fission of enriched uranium that decays so rapidly it becomes worthless within days. (Jason Henry/The New York Times/Fotoarena)

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Engineers gear up for production of ...
Data da imagem: 18/07/2017
Cod. da imagem: ny120118180514
Crédito: Lyndon French/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

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Engineers gear up for production of Molybdenum-99, a lifesaving radioisotope, at a Shine Medical Technologies research lab.

Data da imagem: 18/07/2017

Cod. da imagem: ny120118180514

Engineers gear up for production of Molybdenum-99, a lifesaving radioisotope, at a Shine Medical Technologies research lab.

Crédito: Lyndon French/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

Engineers gear up for production of Molybdenum-99, a lifesaving radioisotope, at a Shine Medical Technologies research lab in Marona, Wis., a suburb of Madison, July 20, 2017. In a daily global race, suppliers seek to deliver to U.S. hospitals cancer-fighting isotopes that disappear hour by hour. (Lyndon French/The New York Times/Fotoarena)

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Greg Pfeifer, the founder of Shine ...
Data da imagem: 17/07/2017
Cod. da imagem: ny120118180713
Crédito: Lyndon French/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

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Greg Pfeifer, the founder of Shine Medical Technologies, in a cornfield where the company is now building a nuclear plant that will make Molybdenum-99, a lifesaving radioisotope.

Data da imagem: 17/07/2017

Cod. da imagem: ny120118180713

Greg Pfeifer, the founder of Shine Medical Technologies, in a cornfield where the company is now building a nuclear plant that will make Molybdenum-99, a lifesaving radioisotope.

Crédito: Lyndon French/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

Greg Pfeifer, the founder of Shine Medical Technologies, in a cornfield where the company is now building a nuclear plant that will make Molybdenum-99, a lifesaving radioisotope, in Janesville, Wis., July 20, 2017. In a daily global race, suppliers seek to deliver to U.S. hospitals cancer-fighting isotopes that disappear hour by hour. (Lyndon French/The New York Times/Fotoarena)

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