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Jen Mouer at home in Richmond, Va.
Data da imagem: 11/01/2018
Cod. da imagem: ny120118212613
Crédito: Khue Bui/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

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Jen Mouer at home in Richmond, Va.

Data da imagem: 11/01/2018

Cod. da imagem: ny120118212613

Jen Mouer at home in Richmond, Va.

Crédito: Khue Bui/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

Jen Mouer, mother of 16-year-old twin daughters, at home in Richmond, Va., Jan. 11, 2018. To help pay for the girls' college educations, Mouer and her husband have been saving in a 529 account and had planned to use a home equity line of credit for school bills, but the government?s new tax law has taken a bit of wind out of their sails. (Khue Bui/The New York Times/Fotoarena)

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Jen and Daniel Mouer with their twin ...
Data da imagem: 11/01/2018
Cod. da imagem: ny120118212911
Crédito: Khue Bui/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

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Jen and Daniel Mouer with their twin daughters at home in Richmond, Va.

Data da imagem: 11/01/2018

Cod. da imagem: ny120118212911

Jen and Daniel Mouer with their twin daughters at home in Richmond, Va.

Crédito: Khue Bui/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

Jen and Daniel Mouer with their 16-year-old twin daughters at home in Richmond, Va., Jan. 11, 2018. To help pay for the girls' college educations, the couple has been saving in a 529 account and had planned to use a home equity line of credit for school bills, but the government?s new tax law has taken a bit of wind out of their sails. (Khue Bui/The New York Times/Fotoarena)

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Employees at Umpqua Bank's ...
Data da imagem: 16/12/2017
Cod. da imagem: ny161217001612
Crédito: Ruth Fremson/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

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Employees at Umpqua Bank's headquarters have a paper snowball fight during their daily morning "motivational moment" as part of their Employee Freeze Day, in Portland, Ore.

Data da imagem: 16/12/2017

Cod. da imagem: ny161217001612

Employees at Umpqua Bank's headquarters have a paper snowball fight during their daily morning "motivational moment" as part of their Employee Freeze Day, in Portland, Ore.

Crédito: Ruth Fremson/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

Employees at Umpqua Bank's headquarters have a paper snowball fight during their daily morning "motivational moment" as part of their Employee Freeze Day, in Portland, Ore., Dec. 15, 2017. Few financial services companies spoke up after the Equifax breach affected 145 million people, but Umpqua Bank held a credit freeze day for its employees. (Ruth fremson/The New York Times/Fotoarena)

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Homes in Memphis, Tenn.
Data da imagem: 14/12/2017
Cod. da imagem: ny291217001412
Crédito: Houston Cofield/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

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Homes in Memphis, Tenn.

Data da imagem: 14/12/2017

Cod. da imagem: ny291217001412

Homes in Memphis, Tenn.

Crédito: Houston Cofield/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

FILE ? Homes in Memphis, Tenn., Dec. 14, 2017. For some taxpayers making a last-minute prepayment of property tax, their bank?s filing with the IRS may not match their tax return. (Houston Cofield/The New York Times/Fotoarena)

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Kae Yates and her husband Reginald, ...
Data da imagem: 07/12/2017
Cod. da imagem: ny081217171613
Crédito: Brad Torchia/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

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Kae Yates and her husband Reginald, who lives in an assisted home in the wake of multiple strokes, in Pomona, Calif.

Data da imagem: 07/12/2017

Cod. da imagem: ny081217171613

Kae Yates and her husband Reginald, who lives in an assisted home in the wake of multiple strokes, in Pomona, Calif.

Crédito: Brad Torchia/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

Kae Yates and her husband Reginald, who lives in an assisted home in the wake of multiple strokes, in Pomona, Calif., Dec. 7, 2017. Republican efforts to eliminate the tax deductions for medical expenses are a critical matter for many older Americans; without them, Yates figures she and her husband would run out of savings in about five years. (Brad Torchia/The New York Times/Fotoarena)

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Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer ...
Data da imagem: 02/11/2017
Cod. da imagem: ny021117224312
Crédito: Al Drago/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

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Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) during a news conference about the Democrats' stance against the new Republican-led tax plan, on ...

Data da imagem: 02/11/2017

Cod. da imagem: ny021117224312

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) during a news conference about the Democrats' stance against the new Republican-led tax plan, on Capitol Hill in Washington.

Crédito: Al Drago/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) during a news conference about the Democrats' stance against the new Republican-led tax plan, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Nov. 2, 2017. The Republican plan would cut corporate taxes to 20 percent while delivering more modest savings for middle-class families but would not impact 401(k) plans as many feared. (Al Drago/The New York Times/Fotoarena)

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Jed Shafer has dinner with his family ...
Data da imagem: 23/10/2017
Cod. da imagem: ny271017131712
Crédito: Ruth Fremson/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

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Jed Shafer has dinner with his family at home in Eugene, Ore.

Data da imagem: 23/10/2017

Cod. da imagem: ny271017131712

Jed Shafer has dinner with his family at home in Eugene, Ore.

Crédito: Ruth Fremson/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

Jed Shafer's family, from left, Julius, 10, Mary, and Jalen, 4, at home in Eugene, Ore., Oct. 24, 2017. For years, Jed Shafer, a teacher, had thought he was enrolled in a student loan forgiveness program. It turns out he wasn?t. (Ruth Fremson/The New York Times/Fotoarena)

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Jed Shafer has dinner with his family ...
Data da imagem: 23/10/2017
Cod. da imagem: ny271017131110
Crédito: Ruth Fremson/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

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Jed Shafer has dinner with his family at home in Eugene, Ore.

Data da imagem: 23/10/2017

Cod. da imagem: ny271017131110

Jed Shafer has dinner with his family at home in Eugene, Ore.

Crédito: Ruth Fremson/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

Jed Shafer has dinner with his family at home in Eugene, Ore., Oct. 24, 2017. For years, Shafer, a teacher, had thought he was enrolled in a student loan forgiveness program. It turns out he wasn?t. (Ruth Fremson/The New York Times/Fotoarena)

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Jed Shafer at the school where he ...
Data da imagem: 23/10/2017
Cod. da imagem: ny271017131111
Crédito: Ruth Fremson/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

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Jed Shafer at the school where he works, helping dropouts get their high school equivalency diplomas, in Eugene, Ore.

Data da imagem: 23/10/2017

Cod. da imagem: ny271017131111

Jed Shafer at the school where he works, helping dropouts get their high school equivalency diplomas, in Eugene, Ore.

Crédito: Ruth Fremson/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

Jed Shafer at the school where he works, helping dropouts get their high school equivalency diplomas, in Eugene, Ore., Oct. 24, 2017. For years, Shafer, a teacher, had thought he was enrolled in a student loan forgiveness program. It turns out he wasn?t. (Ruth Fremson/The New York Times/Fotoarena)

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Three homes on a single plot of land ...
Data da imagem: 11/10/2017
Cod. da imagem: ny021117200012
Crédito: Andrew Burton/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

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Three homes on a single plot of land in Berkeley, Calif.

Data da imagem: 11/10/2017

Cod. da imagem: ny021117200012

Three homes on a single plot of land in Berkeley, Calif.

Crédito: Andrew Burton/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

Three homes on a single plot of land in Berkeley, Calif., Oct. 11, 2017. Current homeowners won?t see their mortgage interest deductions disappear in the new tax bill unveiled by the House of Representatives, but the debate is almost certainly not over. (Andrew Burton/The New York Times/Fotoarena)

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Richard F. Smith, the former chief ...
Data da imagem: 03/10/2017
Cod. da imagem: ny041017220311
Crédito: Pete Marovich/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

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Richard F. Smith, the former chief executive of Equifax, seen on a TV screen, during a House Energy and Commerce subcommittee on Digital Commerce and Consumer Protection hearing, on Capitol Hill in ...

Data da imagem: 03/10/2017

Cod. da imagem: ny041017220311

Richard F. Smith, the former chief executive of Equifax, seen on a TV screen, during a House Energy and Commerce subcommittee on Digital Commerce and Consumer Protection hearing, on Capitol Hill in Washington

Crédito: Pete Marovich/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

FILE -- Richard F. Smith, the former chief executive of Equifax, seen on a TV screen, during a House Energy and Commerce subcommittee on Digital Commerce and Consumer Protection hearing, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Oct. 3, 2017. An intramural spat has broken out between Equifax and the other credit bureaus centered on what the best remedies are in the wake of the Equifax breach and what they should cost, if anything. (Pete Marovich/The New York Times/Fotoarena)

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Richard F. Smith, the former chief ...
Data da imagem: 03/10/2017
Cod. da imagem: ny041017173510
Crédito: Pete Marovich/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

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Richard F. Smith, the former chief executive of Equifax, is questioned by Rep. Jan Schakowsky (D-Ill.), on monitor, the ranking Democrat on the House Energy and Commerce subcommittee on Digital ...

Data da imagem: 03/10/2017

Cod. da imagem: ny041017173510

Richard F. Smith, the former chief executive of Equifax, is questioned by Rep. Jan Schakowsky (D-Ill.), on monitor, the ranking Democrat on the House Energy and Commerce subcommittee on Digital Commerce and Consumer Protection.

Crédito: Pete Marovich/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

FILE -- Richard F. Smith, the former chief executive of Equifax, is questioned by Rep. Jan Schakowsky (D-Ill.), on monitor, the ranking Democrat on the House Energy and Commerce subcommittee on Digital Commerce and Consumer Protection, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Oct. 3, 2017. An intramural spat has broken out between Equifax and the other credit bureaus centered on what the best remedies are in the wake of the Equifax breach and what they should cost, if anything. (Pete Marovich/The New York Times/Fotoarena)

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Richard Smith, the former chief ...
Data da imagem: 03/10/2017
Cod. da imagem: ny061017124512
Crédito: Pete Marovich/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

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Richard Smith, the former chief executive of Equifax, arrives to testify before the House Energy and Commerce Committee in Washington.

Data da imagem: 03/10/2017

Cod. da imagem: ny061017124512

Richard Smith, the former chief executive of Equifax, arrives to testify before the House Energy and Commerce Committee in Washington.

Crédito: Pete Marovich/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

FILE ? Richard Smith, the former chief executive of Equifax, arrives to testify before the House Energy and Commerce Committee in Washington, Oct. 3, 2017. When asked whether people should be able to delete their data from Equifax?s systems, he eventually said that his answer was no. (Pete Marovich/The New York Times/Fotoarena)

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Janam Tea Parlor in New York.
Data da imagem: 17/09/2017
Cod. da imagem: ny161217163513
Crédito: Yeong-ung Yang/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

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Janam Tea Parlor in New York.

Data da imagem: 17/09/2017

Cod. da imagem: ny161217163513

Janam Tea Parlor in New York.

Crédito: Yeong-ung Yang/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

FILE ? Janam Tea Parlor in New York, Sept. 17, 2017. In the Republican tax code rewrite, small-business owners will generally be able to deduct 20 percent of their qualified business income from a partnership, S corporation and sole proprietorship. (Yeong-Ung Yang/The New York Times/Fotoarena)

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The Equifax offices on Peachtree ...
Data da imagem: 12/09/2017
Cod. da imagem: ny140917170904
Crédito: Kevin D. Liles/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

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The Equifax offices on Peachtree Street in Atlanta.

Data da imagem: 12/09/2017

Cod. da imagem: ny140917170904

The Equifax offices on Peachtree Street in Atlanta.

Crédito: Kevin D. Liles/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

The Equifax offices on Peachtree Street in Atlanta, Sept. 12, 2017. The company announced in September that up to 143 million people may have had their Social Security numbers and other data stolen.(Kevin D. Liles/The New York Times/Fotoarena)

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Jenny Nicholson, a co-creator of the ...
Data da imagem: 07/09/2017
Cod. da imagem: ny080917132103
Crédito: Roger Kisby/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

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Jenny Nicholson, a co-creator of the poverty-simulation game called Spent, at The Nomad Hotel in New York.

Data da imagem: 07/09/2017

Cod. da imagem: ny080917132103

Jenny Nicholson, a co-creator of the poverty-simulation game called Spent, at The Nomad Hotel in New York.

Crédito: Roger Kisby/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

Jenny Nicholson, a co-creator of the poverty-simulation game called Spent, at The Nomad Hotel in New York, Sept. 7, 2017. Payback, a new game Nicholson helped create, marches students through a series of decisions, from which school to attend, to when and how to accept paid work, to whether to join (and pay for) a fraternity or sorority. ?I hope everyone who plays will understand the concept that you don?t have to give up everything to succeed,? she said. (Roger Kisby/The New York Times/Fotoarena)

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Jenny Nicholson, a co-creator of the ...
Data da imagem: 07/09/2017
Cod. da imagem: ny080917132203
Crédito: Roger Kisby/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

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Jenny Nicholson, a co-creator of the poverty-simulation game called Spent, looks at the Payback game, which she also helped create, at The Nomad Hotel in New York.

Data da imagem: 07/09/2017

Cod. da imagem: ny080917132203

Jenny Nicholson, a co-creator of the poverty-simulation game called Spent, looks at the Payback game, which she also helped create, at The Nomad Hotel in New York.

Crédito: Roger Kisby/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

Jenny Nicholson, a co-creator of the poverty-simulation game called Spent, looks at the Payback game, which she also helped create, at The Nomad Hotel in New York, Sept. 7, 2017. Payback marches students through a series of decisions, from which school to attend to when and how to accept paid work to whether to join (and pay for) a fraternity or sorority. (Roger Kisby/The New York Times/Fotoarena)

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Estelle Stasz, a Medicaid specialist ...
Data da imagem: 28/07/2017
Cod. da imagem: ny280717131009
Crédito: Kayana Szymczak/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

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Estelle Stasz, a Medicaid specialist for an elder-law attorney, with Robert Wilce, a client, in Amherst, Mass.

Data da imagem: 28/07/2017

Cod. da imagem: ny280717131009

Estelle Stasz, a Medicaid specialist for an elder-law attorney, with Robert Wilce, a client, in Amherst, Mass.

Crédito: Kayana Szymczak/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

Estelle Stasz, a Medicaid specialist for an elder-law attorney, with Robert Wilce, a client, in Amherst, Mass., July 27, 2017. Stasz helps clients understand Medicaid rules, shepherds their applications, assists service providers who want to be paid and will appeal to Medicaid gatekeepers who can be tough about the regulations. (Kayana Szymczak/The New York Times/Fotoarena)

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Susan Flanders, a retired Episcopal ...
Data da imagem: 13/07/2017
Cod. da imagem: ny140717141503
Crédito: Erik Jacobs/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

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Susan Flanders, a retired Episcopal priest who watched her father die slowly from Alzheimer’s, at her family's house in Truro, Mass.

Data da imagem: 13/07/2017

Cod. da imagem: ny140717141503

Susan Flanders, a retired Episcopal priest who watched her father die slowly from Alzheimer’s, at her family's house in Truro, Mass.

Crédito: Erik Jacobs/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

Susan Flanders, a retired Episcopal priest who watched her father die slowly from Alzheimer?s, at her family's house in Truro, Mass., July 13, 2017. Flanders believes the aid-in-dying movement may progress, giving people an alternative to Medicaid and long-term care insurance. ?What many people care about isn?t living as long as we possibly can,? she said. ?It?s about having a reasonably good quality of life for as long as we can.? (Erik Jacobs/The New York Times/Fotoarena)

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Susan Flanders, a retired Episcopal ...
Data da imagem: 13/07/2017
Cod. da imagem: ny140717141403
Crédito: Erik Jacobs/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

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Susan Flanders, a retired Episcopal priest who watched her father die slowly from Alzheimer’s, on Ballston Beach in Truro, Mass.

Data da imagem: 13/07/2017

Cod. da imagem: ny140717141403

Susan Flanders, a retired Episcopal priest who watched her father die slowly from Alzheimer’s, on Ballston Beach in Truro, Mass.

Crédito: Erik Jacobs/ The New York Times/ Fotoarena

Susan Flanders, a retired Episcopal priest who watched her father die slowly from Alzheimer?s, on Ballston Beach in Truro, Mass., July 13, 2017. Flanders believes the aid-in-dying movement may progress, giving people an alternative to Medicaid and long-term care insurance. ?What many people care about isn?t living as long as we possibly can,? she said. ?It?s about having a reasonably good quality of life for as long as we can.? (Erik Jacobs/The New York Times/Fotoarena)

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