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Postage Stamp isolated

Data da imagem: 19/10/2016
Cod. da imagem: HP6099
Crédito: Myron Standret/ Alamy/ Fotoarena

Royalty Free


Data da imagem: 19/10/2016

Cod. da imagem: HP6099

Crédito: Myron Standret/ Alamy/ Fotoarena

TERNOPIL, UKRAINE - OCTOBER 19, 2016: a stamp printed in the USA shows image of the brothers Orville and Wilbur Wright, american aviation pioneers, honoring the 75th anniversary of first powered flight, circa 1978

Criativa RF
Loganair Saab 340B Registration G-LGNM Flybe departing Inverness ...

Data da imagem: 25/08/2016
Cod. da imagem: GN26WG
Crédito: David Gowans/ Alamy/ Fotoarena

Royalty Free


Data da imagem: 25/08/2016

Cod. da imagem: GN26WG

Crédito: David Gowans/ Alamy/ Fotoarena

Originally designated the SF340, the aircraft first flew on 25 January 1983. When Fairchild exited the aircraft manufacturing business in 1985 after about 40 units, Saab dropped the name Fairchild from the project and continued aircraft production under the designation Saab 340A and 159 A models were built. An improved version, the second generation 340B, introduced more powerful engines and wider horizontal stabilizers in 1989 and the later 340Bs also had an active noise control system. 200 aircraft were built. The final third generation version, the 340B Plus, was delivered for service in 1994 and incorporated improvements that were being introduced at the same time in the Saab 2000. 100 aircraft were built adding up to a total of 300 B models. The Saab 340 typically seated between 30 and 36 passengers, with 34 seats being the most common configuration. The last two 340s built were constructed as older configuration 36-seat aircraft for Japan Air Commuter. One of the improvements introduced in the 340B Plus was the installation of an active noise and vibration control system in the cabin, reducing noise and vibration levels by about ten dB during cruising flight. This optional feature carried over from the 340B was standard in the 340B Plus along with extended wingtips which was an option on the 340B, about 30 aircraft having the WT option. Another change from earlier models was a more modern interior design and the moving of the lavatory compartment from the aft of the passenger cabin to just aft of the flight deck in most 3rd generation units. This increased total available cargo volume as the original location intruded into the cargo bin area. While the active noise control became standard on all Saab 340Bs in 1994 the first-ever 340B Plus (third B+ built) was delivered new to Hazelton Airlines in Australia in 1995, later operating for Regional Express, and currently for the Japanese Coast Guard.

Criativa RF
Falbe Saab 340B Registration G-LGNB Departing Inverness Dalcross ...

Data da imagem: 23/08/2016
Cod. da imagem: GM9ETK
Crédito: David Gowans/ Alamy/ Fotoarena

Royalty Free


Data da imagem: 23/08/2016

Cod. da imagem: GM9ETK

Crédito: David Gowans/ Alamy/ Fotoarena

Originally designated the SF340, the aircraft first flew on 25 January 1983. When Fairchild exited the aircraft manufacturing business in 1985 after about 40 units, Saab dropped the name Fairchild from the project and continued aircraft production under the designation Saab 340A and 159 A models were built. An improved version, the second generation 340B, introduced more powerful engines and wider horizontal stabilizers in 1989 and the later 340Bs also had an active noise control system. 200 aircraft were built. The final third generation version, the 340B Plus, was delivered for service in 1994 and incorporated improvements that were being introduced at the same time in the Saab 2000. 100 aircraft were built adding up to a total of 300 B models. The Saab 340 typically seated between 30 and 36 passengers, with 34 seats being the most common configuration. The last two 340s built were constructed as older configuration 36-seat aircraft for Japan Air Commuter. One of the improvements introduced in the 340B Plus was the installation of an active noise and vibration control system in the cabin, reducing noise and vibration levels by about ten dB during cruising flight. This optional feature carried over from the 340B was standard in the 340B Plus along with extended wingtips which was an option on the 340B, about 30 aircraft having the WT option. Another change from earlier models was a more modern interior design and the moving of the lavatory compartment from the aft of the passenger cabin to just aft of the flight deck in most 3rd generation units. This increased total available cargo volume as the original location intruded into the cargo bin area. While the active noise control became standard on all Saab 340Bs in 1994 the first-ever 340B Plus (third B+ built) was delivered new to Hazelton Airlines in Australia in 1995, later operating for Regional Express, and currently for the Japanese Coast Guard.

Criativa RF
Gloster meteor Jetfighter

Data da imagem: 09/08/2016
Cod. da imagem: HG5RFB
Crédito: craige bevil/ Alamy/ Fotoarena

Royalty Free


Data da imagem: 09/08/2016

Cod. da imagem: HG5RFB

Crédito: craige bevil/ Alamy/ Fotoarena

The Gloster Meteor was the first British jet fighter and the Allies' only operational jet aircraft during the Second World War. The Meteor's development was heavily reliant on its ground-breaking turbojet engines, pioneered by Sir Frank Whittle and his company, Power Jets Ltd. Development of the aircraft began in 1940, although work on the engines had been under way since 1936. The Meteor first flew in 1943 and commenced operations on 27 July 1944 with No. 616 Squadron RAF. Nicknamed the "Meatbox", the Meteor was not a sophisticated aircraft in its aerodynamics, but proved to be a successful combat fighter. Gloster's 1946 civil Meteor F.4 demonstrator G-AIDC was the first civilian-registered jet aircraft in the world.[1]Several major variants of the Meteor incorporated technological advances during the 1940s and 1950s. Thousands of Meteors were built to fly with the RAF and other air forces and remained in use for several decades. The Meteor saw limited action in the Second World War. Meteors of the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) fought in the Korean War. Several other operators such as Argentina, Egypt and Israel flew Meteors in later regional conflicts. Specialised variants of the Meteor were developed for use in photographic aerial reconnaissance and as night fighters.The Meteor was also used for research and development purposes and to break several aviation records. On 7 November 1945, the first official air speed record by a jet aircraft was set by a Meteor F.3 of 606 miles per hour (975 km/h). In 1946, this record was broken when a Meteor F.4 reached a speed of 616 mph (991 km/h). Other performance-related records were broken in categories including flight time endurance, rate of climb, and speed. On 20 September 1945, a heavily modified Meteor I, powered by two Rolls-Royce Trent turbine engines driving propellers, became the first turboprop aircraft to fly.[2] On 10 February 1954, a specially adapted Meteor F.8, the "Meteor Prone Pilot", which placed th

Criativa RF
One of two prototypes of the Embraer KC-390 tanker transport planes ...

Data da imagem: 11/07/2016
Cod. da imagem: HH1689
Crédito: Avpics/ Alamy/ Fotoarena

Royalty Free


Data da imagem: 11/07/2016

Cod. da imagem: HH1689

Crédito: Avpics/ Alamy/ Fotoarena

The Embraer KC-390 is a medium-size, twin-engine jet-powered military transport aircraft under development by Brazilian aerospace manufacturer Embraer, able to perform aerial refuelling and to transport cargo and troops. It is the heaviest aircraft that the company has made to date, and will be able to transport up to 26 t (29 tons) of cargo, including wheeled armoured fighting vehicles.Two prototypes were planned by the program. The first prototype (PT-ZNF) rolled out from the Embraer subsidiary plant, Embraer Defense and Security, at Gaviao Peixoto, Sao Paulo on 21 October 2014, and flew for the first time on 3 February 2015.In July 2015 the company announced a two-year delay in the flight test program, citing the devaluation of the Brazilian currency and government spending cuts. However, a second test flight took place at Gaviao Peixoto on 26 October 2015. By February 2016, the first prototype had logged more than 100 hours of flight. With the resumption of flight-testing, the manufacturer expected to certify the aircraft in 2017 and begin deliveries in 2018. The eight months between test flights were used to conduct ground vibration tests to validate aeroelastic models, as well as avionics, mission, landing gear and electric and hydraulic flight control system testing. Embraer has reported good availability for testing, sometimes doing two flights per day. The aircraft was tested to the limits of speed, Mach number and altitude, as well as all slats, flaps and landing gear positions.The second prototype (PT-ZNJ) was finished in March 2016 and made the first flight on 28 April 2016.

Criativa RF
Arab Emirates Airbus 380-361 (Reg Serial A6-APB) approaching ...

Data da imagem: 01/04/2016
Cod. da imagem: G3ARTJ
Crédito: David Gowans/ Alamy/ Fotoarena

Royalty Free


Data da imagem: 01/04/2016

Cod. da imagem: G3ARTJ

Crédito: David Gowans/ Alamy/ Fotoarena

In 2010 Airbus announced a new A380 build standard, incorporating a strengthened airframe structure and a 1.5ø increase in wing twist. Airbus will also offer, as an option, an improved maximum take-off weight, thus providing a better payload/range performance. Maximum take-off weight is increased by 4 t (8,800 lb), to 573 t (1,263,000 lb) and the range is extended by 100 nautical miles (190 km); this is achieved by reducing flight loads, partly from optimising the fly-by-wire control laws. British Airways and Emirates are the first two customers to have received this new option in 2013. Emirates has asked for an update with new engines for the A380 to be competitive with the 777X around 2020, and Airbus is studying 11-abreast seating.[ In 2012 Airbus announced another increase in the A380's maximum take-off weight to 575 t (1,268,000 lb), a 6 t hike on the initial A380 variant and 2 t higher than the increased-weight proposal of 2010. It will stretch the range by some 150 nautical miles (280 km), taking its capability to around 8,350 nautical miles (15,460 km) at current payloads. The higher-weight version was offered for introduction to service early in 2013.

Criativa RF
Wright brothers first powered flight in the Wright Flyer at Kill ...

Data da imagem: 02/02/2016
Cod. da imagem: FDX5JM
Crédito: Ian Dagnall/ Alamy/ Fotoarena

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Data da imagem: 02/02/2016

Cod. da imagem: FDX5JM

Crédito: Ian Dagnall/ Alamy/ Fotoarena

Image digitally restored and retouched

Editorial RM
Wright brothers first powered flight in the Wright Flyer at Kill ...

Data da imagem: 02/02/2016
Cod. da imagem: FDX5T1
Crédito: IanDagnall Computing/ Alamy/ Fotoarena

Direito Controlado


Data da imagem: 02/02/2016

Cod. da imagem: FDX5T1

Crédito: IanDagnall Computing/ Alamy/ Fotoarena

Image digitally restored and retouched

Editorial RM
Westland Wessex HCC4

Data da imagem: 31/12/2015
Cod. da imagem: FB8WFW
Crédito: Paul Briden/ Alamy/ Fotoarena

Direito Controlado


Data da imagem: 31/12/2015

Cod. da imagem: FB8WFW

Crédito: Paul Briden/ Alamy/ Fotoarena

The Wessex was a turbine-powered development of the American Sikorsky S58. The initial production version was for the Royal Navy but in the early 1960s the RAF required a powerful general-purpose helicopter capable of troop-carrying, air ambulance and ground attack roles. Westland responded with the Wessex HC2 which first entered RAF service with No.18 Squadron, based at RAF Odiham, Hampshire, in January 1964. Four years later Westland Helicopters received an order for two Wessex aircraft to equip The Queen's Flight. These were designated HCC4. The aircraft were built to HC2 standard but with the main cabin having a VIP interior finish, furnishings and sound proofing plus an external folding step below the cabin door. Additional Decca navigation equipment was installed on the flight deck. The first flight took place on 17 March 1969. The first official flight was on 1 July 1969 in support of the Investiture of the Prince of Wales at Caernarfon Castle, Wales. The helicopters in their distinctive red/dark blue paint scheme operated for many years from RAF Benson. From 31 March 1995 they moved to RAF Northolt and became part of No.32 (The Royal) Squadron. The Wessex HCC4 was retired in 1998 and No.32 (The Royal) Squadron gave up the task of providing helicopters for the Royal Family. The Royal Household awarded a ten year contract to Sikorsky Aircraft Corporation and Hanson Helicopters to provide the Queen with an S76 and civilian crew.

Editorial RM
Preserved Hawker Demon fighter flying at the Shuttleworth Trust

Data da imagem: 04/10/2015
Cod. da imagem: F4C1FR
Crédito: Niall Ferguson/ Alamy/ Fotoarena

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Data da imagem: 04/10/2015

Cod. da imagem: F4C1FR

Crédito: Niall Ferguson/ Alamy/ Fotoarena

The Hawker Demon was a two seat fighter aircraft developed from the Hawker Hart light bomber. When that aircraft had first flown in 1928, it was faster than every fighter in RAF service. The logical assumption was that any potential enemy would also be able to produce bombers with the same speed. It was thus essential to produce a fighter capable of catching the Hart. The aircraft that would achieve this was the Hawker Fury, the first of a new breed of interceptor fighter. However, Hawker also produced the Demon, a fighter based on the Hart. The resulting aircraft was very similar to the Hart. However, it was powered by the supercharged Kestrel IIS, which gave it better performance at high altitudes than the Hart. The first prototype Demons were produced by modifying production Harts during 1930. At first the new aircraft was known as the Hart Fighter, being renamed the Demon in July 1932. Six Hart Fighters were produced by May 1931, when they entered service with one flight of No. 23 Squadron. The aircraft was ordered into full production, entering full service in 1933. In all 305 Demons were produced, 232 of them for the RAF. The Demon was not a great success as a fighter. The speed of the aircraft was such that the rear gunner had great difficulty manoeuvring the gun against the slipstream produced at high speeds. In response the Demon was given a basic Frazer-Nash turret. This consisted of a protective shield, hydraulically powered, which much improved the rear gunner's accuracy. However, when the turret was pointed to the side, it badly affected the accuracy of the two fixed guns. No 23 Squadron became the first full Demon squadron in April 1933. Eventually the type equipped seven regular squadrons and five squadrons of the Auxiliary Air Force. K8203 is preserved at the Shuttleworth Trust in Bedfordshire.

Editorial RM
Preserved Hawker Demon fighter flying at the Shuttleworth Trust

Data da imagem: 04/10/2015
Cod. da imagem: F4C1FK
Crédito: Niall Ferguson/ Alamy/ Fotoarena

Direito Controlado


Data da imagem: 04/10/2015

Cod. da imagem: F4C1FK

Crédito: Niall Ferguson/ Alamy/ Fotoarena

The Hawker Demon was a two seat fighter aircraft developed from the Hawker Hart light bomber. When that aircraft had first flown in 1928, it was faster than every fighter in RAF service. The logical assumption was that any potential enemy would also be able to produce bombers with the same speed. It was thus essential to produce a fighter capable of catching the Hart. The aircraft that would achieve this was the Hawker Fury, the first of a new breed of interceptor fighter. However, Hawker also produced the Demon, a fighter based on the Hart. The resulting aircraft was very similar to the Hart. However, it was powered by the supercharged Kestrel IIS, which gave it better performance at high altitudes than the Hart. The first prototype Demons were produced by modifying production Harts during 1930. At first the new aircraft was known as the Hart Fighter, being renamed the Demon in July 1932. Six Hart Fighters were produced by May 1931, when they entered service with one flight of No. 23 Squadron. The aircraft was ordered into full production, entering full service in 1933. In all 305 Demons were produced, 232 of them for the RAF. The Demon was not a great success as a fighter. The speed of the aircraft was such that the rear gunner had great difficulty manoeuvring the gun against the slipstream produced at high speeds. In response the Demon was given a basic Frazer-Nash turret. This consisted of a protective shield, hydraulically powered, which much improved the rear gunner's accuracy. However, when the turret was pointed to the side, it badly affected the accuracy of the two fixed guns. No 23 Squadron became the first full Demon squadron in April 1933. Eventually the type equipped seven regular squadrons and five squadrons of the Auxiliary Air Force. K8203 is preserved at the Shuttleworth Trust in Bedfordshire.

Editorial RM
The final airshow ever for the Avro Vulcan cold war V-bomber which ...

Data da imagem: 04/10/2015
Cod. da imagem: F42DBP
Crédito: Niall Ferguson/ Alamy/ Fotoarena

Direito Controlado


Data da imagem: 04/10/2015

Cod. da imagem: F42DBP

Crédito: Niall Ferguson/ Alamy/ Fotoarena

he Avro Vulcan (sometimes referred to as the Hawker Siddeley Vulcan) is a jet-powered delta wing strategic bomber, which was operated by the Royal Air Force (RAF) from 1956 until 1984. Aircraft manufacturer A V Roe & Co (Avro) designed the Vulcan in response to Specification B.35/46. Of the three V bombers produced, the Vulcan was considered the riskiest option. Several scale aircraft, designated Avro 707, were produced to test and refine the delta wing design principles. The Vulcan B.1 was first delivered to the RAF in 1956; deliveries of the improved Vulcan B.2 started in 1960. The B.2 featured more powerful engines, a larger wing, an improved electrical system and electronic countermeasures (ECM); many were modified to accept the Blue Steel missile. As a part of the V-force, the Vulcan was the backbone of the United Kingdom’s airborne nuclear deterrent during much of the Cold War. Although the Vulcan was typically armed with nuclear weapons, it was capable of conventional bombing missions, a capability which was used in Operation Black Buck during the Falklands War, a conflict between Britain and Argentina in 1982. The Vulcan lacked defensive weaponry, initially relying upon high-speed high-altitude flight to evade interception. A change to low-level tactics was made in the mid-1960s. In the mid 1970s, nine Vulcans were adapted for maritime radar reconnaissance operations, redesignated as B.2 (MRR). In the final years of service, six Vulcans were converted to the K.2 tanker configuration for aerial refuelling. Since retirement by the RAF one example, B.2 XH558, named "The Spirit of Great Britain" has been restored for use in display flights and air shows, whilst two other B.2s, XL426 and XM655, are kept in taxiable condition for ground runs and demonstrations at London Southend Airport and Wellesbourne Mountford Airfield respectively. 2015 will be this Vulcan's last year flying

Editorial RM
Old Warden, Bedford, UK. 4th October, 2015. The Shuttleworth Trust's ...

Data da imagem: 04/10/2015
Cod. da imagem: F3BWWK
Crédito: Niall Ferguson/ Alamy/ Fotoarena

Direito Controlado


Data da imagem: 04/10/2015

Cod. da imagem: F3BWWK

Crédito: Niall Ferguson/ Alamy/ Fotoarena

The Avro Vulcan (sometimes referred to as the Hawker Siddeley Vulcan) is a jet-powered delta wing strategic bomber, which was operated by the Royal Air Force (RAF) from 1956 until 1984. Aircraft manufacturer A V Roe & Co (Avro) designed the Vulcan in response to Specification B.35/46. Of the three V bombers produced, the Vulcan was considered the riskiest option. Several scale aircraft, designated Avro 707, were produced to test and refine the delta wing design principles. The Vulcan B.1 was first delivered to the RAF in 1956; deliveries of the improved Vulcan B.2 started in 1960. The B.2 featured more powerful engines, a larger wing, an improved electrical system and electronic countermeasures (ECM); many were modified to accept the Blue Steel missile. As a part of the V-force, the Vulcan was the backbone of the United Kingdom’s airborne nuclear deterrent during much of the Cold War. Although the Vulcan was typically armed with nuclear weapons, it was capable of conventional bombing missions, a capability which was used in Operation Black Buck during the Falklands War, a conflict between Britain and Argentina in 1982. The Vulcan lacked defensive weaponry, initially relying upon high-speed high-altitude flight to evade interception. A change to low-level tactics was made in the mid-1960s. In the mid 1970s, nine Vulcans were adapted for maritime radar reconnaissance operations, redesignated as B.2 (MRR). In the final years of service, six Vulcans were converted to the K.2 tanker configuration for aerial refuelling. Since retirement by the RAF one example, B.2 XH558, named "The Spirit of Great Britain" has been restored for use in display flights and air shows, whilst two other B.2s, XL426 and XM655, are kept in taxiable condition for ground runs and demonstrations at London Southend Airport and Wellesbourne Mountford Airfield respectively. 2015 will be this Vulcan's last year flying

Editorial RM
The final airshow ever for the Avro Vulcan cold war V-bomber which ...

Data da imagem: 04/10/2015
Cod. da imagem: F42DC2
Crédito: Niall Ferguson/ Alamy/ Fotoarena

Direito Controlado


Data da imagem: 04/10/2015

Cod. da imagem: F42DC2

Crédito: Niall Ferguson/ Alamy/ Fotoarena

he Avro Vulcan (sometimes referred to as the Hawker Siddeley Vulcan) is a jet-powered delta wing strategic bomber, which was operated by the Royal Air Force (RAF) from 1956 until 1984. Aircraft manufacturer A V Roe & Co (Avro) designed the Vulcan in response to Specification B.35/46. Of the three V bombers produced, the Vulcan was considered the riskiest option. Several scale aircraft, designated Avro 707, were produced to test and refine the delta wing design principles. The Vulcan B.1 was first delivered to the RAF in 1956; deliveries of the improved Vulcan B.2 started in 1960. The B.2 featured more powerful engines, a larger wing, an improved electrical system and electronic countermeasures (ECM); many were modified to accept the Blue Steel missile. As a part of the V-force, the Vulcan was the backbone of the United Kingdom’s airborne nuclear deterrent during much of the Cold War. Although the Vulcan was typically armed with nuclear weapons, it was capable of conventional bombing missions, a capability which was used in Operation Black Buck during the Falklands War, a conflict between Britain and Argentina in 1982. The Vulcan lacked defensive weaponry, initially relying upon high-speed high-altitude flight to evade interception. A change to low-level tactics was made in the mid-1960s. In the mid 1970s, nine Vulcans were adapted for maritime radar reconnaissance operations, redesignated as B.2 (MRR). In the final years of service, six Vulcans were converted to the K.2 tanker configuration for aerial refuelling. Since retirement by the RAF one example, B.2 XH558, named "The Spirit of Great Britain" has been restored for use in display flights and air shows, whilst two other B.2s, XL426 and XM655, are kept in taxiable condition for ground runs and demonstrations at London Southend Airport and Wellesbourne Mountford Airfield respectively. 2015 will be this Vulcan's last year flying

Editorial RM
Old Warden, Bedford, UK. 4th October, 2015. The Shuttleworth Trust's ...

Data da imagem: 04/10/2015
Cod. da imagem: F3BWWP
Crédito: Niall Ferguson/ Alamy/ Fotoarena

Direito Controlado


Data da imagem: 04/10/2015

Cod. da imagem: F3BWWP

Crédito: Niall Ferguson/ Alamy/ Fotoarena

The Avro Vulcan (sometimes referred to as the Hawker Siddeley Vulcan) is a jet-powered delta wing strategic bomber, which was operated by the Royal Air Force (RAF) from 1956 until 1984. Aircraft manufacturer A V Roe & Co (Avro) designed the Vulcan in response to Specification B.35/46. Of the three V bombers produced, the Vulcan was considered the riskiest option. Several scale aircraft, designated Avro 707, were produced to test and refine the delta wing design principles. The Vulcan B.1 was first delivered to the RAF in 1956; deliveries of the improved Vulcan B.2 started in 1960. The B.2 featured more powerful engines, a larger wing, an improved electrical system and electronic countermeasures (ECM); many were modified to accept the Blue Steel missile. As a part of the V-force, the Vulcan was the backbone of the United Kingdom’s airborne nuclear deterrent during much of the Cold War. Although the Vulcan was typically armed with nuclear weapons, it was capable of conventional bombing missions, a capability which was used in Operation Black Buck during the Falklands War, a conflict between Britain and Argentina in 1982. The Vulcan lacked defensive weaponry, initially relying upon high-speed high-altitude flight to evade interception. A change to low-level tactics was made in the mid-1960s. In the mid 1970s, nine Vulcans were adapted for maritime radar reconnaissance operations, redesignated as B.2 (MRR). In the final years of service, six Vulcans were converted to the K.2 tanker configuration for aerial refuelling. Since retirement by the RAF one example, B.2 XH558, named "The Spirit of Great Britain" has been restored for use in display flights and air shows, whilst two other B.2s, XL426 and XM655, are kept in taxiable condition for ground runs and demonstrations at London Southend Airport and Wellesbourne Mountford Airfield respectively. 2015 will be this Vulcan's last year flying

Editorial RM
Old Warden, Bedford, UK. 4th October, 2015. The Shuttleworth Trust's ...

Data da imagem: 04/10/2015
Cod. da imagem: F3BWWH
Crédito: Niall Ferguson/ Alamy/ Fotoarena

Direito Controlado


Data da imagem: 04/10/2015

Cod. da imagem: F3BWWH

Crédito: Niall Ferguson/ Alamy/ Fotoarena

The Avro Vulcan (sometimes referred to as the Hawker Siddeley Vulcan) is a jet-powered delta wing strategic bomber, which was operated by the Royal Air Force (RAF) from 1956 until 1984. Aircraft manufacturer A V Roe & Co (Avro) designed the Vulcan in response to Specification B.35/46. Of the three V bombers produced, the Vulcan was considered the riskiest option. Several scale aircraft, designated Avro 707, were produced to test and refine the delta wing design principles. The Vulcan B.1 was first delivered to the RAF in 1956; deliveries of the improved Vulcan B.2 started in 1960. The B.2 featured more powerful engines, a larger wing, an improved electrical system and electronic countermeasures (ECM); many were modified to accept the Blue Steel missile. As a part of the V-force, the Vulcan was the backbone of the United Kingdom’s airborne nuclear deterrent during much of the Cold War. Although the Vulcan was typically armed with nuclear weapons, it was capable of conventional bombing missions, a capability which was used in Operation Black Buck during the Falklands War, a conflict between Britain and Argentina in 1982. The Vulcan lacked defensive weaponry, initially relying upon high-speed high-altitude flight to evade interception. A change to low-level tactics was made in the mid-1960s. In the mid 1970s, nine Vulcans were adapted for maritime radar reconnaissance operations, redesignated as B.2 (MRR). In the final years of service, six Vulcans were converted to the K.2 tanker configuration for aerial refuelling. Since retirement by the RAF one example, B.2 XH558, named "The Spirit of Great Britain" has been restored for use in display flights and air shows, whilst two other B.2s, XL426 and XM655, are kept in taxiable condition for ground runs and demonstrations at London Southend Airport and Wellesbourne Mountford Airfield respectively. 2015 will be this Vulcan's last year flying

Editorial RM
The final airshow ever for the Avro Vulcan cold war V-bomber which ...

Data da imagem: 04/10/2015
Cod. da imagem: F42DC6
Crédito: Niall Ferguson/ Alamy/ Fotoarena

Direito Controlado


Data da imagem: 04/10/2015

Cod. da imagem: F42DC6

Crédito: Niall Ferguson/ Alamy/ Fotoarena

he Avro Vulcan (sometimes referred to as the Hawker Siddeley Vulcan) is a jet-powered delta wing strategic bomber, which was operated by the Royal Air Force (RAF) from 1956 until 1984. Aircraft manufacturer A V Roe & Co (Avro) designed the Vulcan in response to Specification B.35/46. Of the three V bombers produced, the Vulcan was considered the riskiest option. Several scale aircraft, designated Avro 707, were produced to test and refine the delta wing design principles. The Vulcan B.1 was first delivered to the RAF in 1956; deliveries of the improved Vulcan B.2 started in 1960. The B.2 featured more powerful engines, a larger wing, an improved electrical system and electronic countermeasures (ECM); many were modified to accept the Blue Steel missile. As a part of the V-force, the Vulcan was the backbone of the United Kingdom’s airborne nuclear deterrent during much of the Cold War. Although the Vulcan was typically armed with nuclear weapons, it was capable of conventional bombing missions, a capability which was used in Operation Black Buck during the Falklands War, a conflict between Britain and Argentina in 1982. The Vulcan lacked defensive weaponry, initially relying upon high-speed high-altitude flight to evade interception. A change to low-level tactics was made in the mid-1960s. In the mid 1970s, nine Vulcans were adapted for maritime radar reconnaissance operations, redesignated as B.2 (MRR). In the final years of service, six Vulcans were converted to the K.2 tanker configuration for aerial refuelling. Since retirement by the RAF one example, B.2 XH558, named "The Spirit of Great Britain" has been restored for use in display flights and air shows, whilst two other B.2s, XL426 and XM655, are kept in taxiable condition for ground runs and demonstrations at London Southend Airport and Wellesbourne Mountford Airfield respectively. 2015 will be this Vulcan's last year flying

Editorial RM
The final airshow ever for the Avro Vulcan cold war V-bomber which ...

Data da imagem: 04/10/2015
Cod. da imagem: F42DBM
Crédito: Niall Ferguson/ Alamy/ Fotoarena

Direito Controlado


Data da imagem: 04/10/2015

Cod. da imagem: F42DBM

Crédito: Niall Ferguson/ Alamy/ Fotoarena

he Avro Vulcan (sometimes referred to as the Hawker Siddeley Vulcan) is a jet-powered delta wing strategic bomber, which was operated by the Royal Air Force (RAF) from 1956 until 1984. Aircraft manufacturer A V Roe & Co (Avro) designed the Vulcan in response to Specification B.35/46. Of the three V bombers produced, the Vulcan was considered the riskiest option. Several scale aircraft, designated Avro 707, were produced to test and refine the delta wing design principles. The Vulcan B.1 was first delivered to the RAF in 1956; deliveries of the improved Vulcan B.2 started in 1960. The B.2 featured more powerful engines, a larger wing, an improved electrical system and electronic countermeasures (ECM); many were modified to accept the Blue Steel missile. As a part of the V-force, the Vulcan was the backbone of the United Kingdom’s airborne nuclear deterrent during much of the Cold War. Although the Vulcan was typically armed with nuclear weapons, it was capable of conventional bombing missions, a capability which was used in Operation Black Buck during the Falklands War, a conflict between Britain and Argentina in 1982. The Vulcan lacked defensive weaponry, initially relying upon high-speed high-altitude flight to evade interception. A change to low-level tactics was made in the mid-1960s. In the mid 1970s, nine Vulcans were adapted for maritime radar reconnaissance operations, redesignated as B.2 (MRR). In the final years of service, six Vulcans were converted to the K.2 tanker configuration for aerial refuelling. Since retirement by the RAF one example, B.2 XH558, named "The Spirit of Great Britain" has been restored for use in display flights and air shows, whilst two other B.2s, XL426 and XM655, are kept in taxiable condition for ground runs and demonstrations at London Southend Airport and Wellesbourne Mountford Airfield respectively. 2015 will be this Vulcan's last year flying

Editorial RM
Old Warden, Bedford, UK. 4th October, 2015. The Shuttleworth Trust's ...

Data da imagem: 04/10/2015
Cod. da imagem: F3BWWW
Crédito: Niall Ferguson/ Alamy/ Fotoarena

Direito Controlado


Data da imagem: 04/10/2015

Cod. da imagem: F3BWWW

Crédito: Niall Ferguson/ Alamy/ Fotoarena

The Avro Vulcan (sometimes referred to as the Hawker Siddeley Vulcan) is a jet-powered delta wing strategic bomber, which was operated by the Royal Air Force (RAF) from 1956 until 1984. Aircraft manufacturer A V Roe & Co (Avro) designed the Vulcan in response to Specification B.35/46. Of the three V bombers produced, the Vulcan was considered the riskiest option. Several scale aircraft, designated Avro 707, were produced to test and refine the delta wing design principles. The Vulcan B.1 was first delivered to the RAF in 1956; deliveries of the improved Vulcan B.2 started in 1960. The B.2 featured more powerful engines, a larger wing, an improved electrical system and electronic countermeasures (ECM); many were modified to accept the Blue Steel missile. As a part of the V-force, the Vulcan was the backbone of the United Kingdom’s airborne nuclear deterrent during much of the Cold War. Although the Vulcan was typically armed with nuclear weapons, it was capable of conventional bombing missions, a capability which was used in Operation Black Buck during the Falklands War, a conflict between Britain and Argentina in 1982. The Vulcan lacked defensive weaponry, initially relying upon high-speed high-altitude flight to evade interception. A change to low-level tactics was made in the mid-1960s. In the mid 1970s, nine Vulcans were adapted for maritime radar reconnaissance operations, redesignated as B.2 (MRR). In the final years of service, six Vulcans were converted to the K.2 tanker configuration for aerial refuelling. Since retirement by the RAF one example, B.2 XH558, named "The Spirit of Great Britain" has been restored for use in display flights and air shows, whilst two other B.2s, XL426 and XM655, are kept in taxiable condition for ground runs and demonstrations at London Southend Airport and Wellesbourne Mountford Airfield respectively. 2015 will be this Vulcan's last year flying

Editorial RM
The final airshow ever for the Avro Vulcan cold war V-bomber which ...

Data da imagem: 04/10/2015
Cod. da imagem: F42DBW
Crédito: Niall Ferguson/ Alamy/ Fotoarena

Direito Controlado


Data da imagem: 04/10/2015

Cod. da imagem: F42DBW

Crédito: Niall Ferguson/ Alamy/ Fotoarena

he Avro Vulcan (sometimes referred to as the Hawker Siddeley Vulcan) is a jet-powered delta wing strategic bomber, which was operated by the Royal Air Force (RAF) from 1956 until 1984. Aircraft manufacturer A V Roe & Co (Avro) designed the Vulcan in response to Specification B.35/46. Of the three V bombers produced, the Vulcan was considered the riskiest option. Several scale aircraft, designated Avro 707, were produced to test and refine the delta wing design principles. The Vulcan B.1 was first delivered to the RAF in 1956; deliveries of the improved Vulcan B.2 started in 1960. The B.2 featured more powerful engines, a larger wing, an improved electrical system and electronic countermeasures (ECM); many were modified to accept the Blue Steel missile. As a part of the V-force, the Vulcan was the backbone of the United Kingdom’s airborne nuclear deterrent during much of the Cold War. Although the Vulcan was typically armed with nuclear weapons, it was capable of conventional bombing missions, a capability which was used in Operation Black Buck during the Falklands War, a conflict between Britain and Argentina in 1982. The Vulcan lacked defensive weaponry, initially relying upon high-speed high-altitude flight to evade interception. A change to low-level tactics was made in the mid-1960s. In the mid 1970s, nine Vulcans were adapted for maritime radar reconnaissance operations, redesignated as B.2 (MRR). In the final years of service, six Vulcans were converted to the K.2 tanker configuration for aerial refuelling. Since retirement by the RAF one example, B.2 XH558, named "The Spirit of Great Britain" has been restored for use in display flights and air shows, whilst two other B.2s, XL426 and XM655, are kept in taxiable condition for ground runs and demonstrations at London Southend Airport and Wellesbourne Mountford Airfield respectively. 2015 will be this Vulcan's last year flying

Editorial RM
 
 
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