Você está pesquisando por News?
+55 11 2193-2960
+55 11 94788-8015
Busca em Album e Agencia:Album e Colecao:AKG Images e Fotografo:Album / Akg-images / Pictures From History (1 - 1716 de 34.301)
Exibição:
Thumb pequena
  • Thumb pequena
  • Thumb média
  • Thumb grande
Autorizações
  • Autorizações
  • Com Model Release
  • Sem Model Release
20 fotos por página
  • 20 fotos por página
  • 40 fotos por página
  • 80 fotos por página





Carregando...


Cod. da imagem: akg4566538
Crédito: Album / akg-images / Pictures From History/ Fotoarena

Direito Controlado


Cod. da imagem: akg4566538

Crédito: Album / akg-images / Pictures From History/ Fotoarena

'The Night Revels of Han Xizai' is a painted scroll depicting Han Xizai, a minister of the Southern Tang Emperor Li Yu (937-978). This narrative painting is split into five distinct sections: Han Xizai listens to the pipa, watches dancers, takes a rest, listens to music, and then sees guests off.

. The original, painted by Gu Hongzhong (937-975), is lost, but a 12th century copy, housed in the Palace Museum in Beijing, survives (reproduced here).

. The full scroll should be viewed from right to left.


Editorial RM


Cod. da imagem: akg4566507
Crédito: Album / akg-images / Pictures From History/ Fotoarena

Direito Controlado


Cod. da imagem: akg4566507

Crédito: Album / akg-images / Pictures From History/ Fotoarena

'Along the River During the Qingming Festival' is a painting by the Song dynasty artist Zhang Zeduan (1085-1145). It captures the daily life of people and the landscape of the Northern Song capital, Bianjing, today's Kaifeng. The theme is said to celebrate the festive spirit and worldly commotion at the Qingming Festival, rather than the holiday's ceremonial aspects, such as tomb sweeping and prayers.

. Successive scenes reveal the lifestyle of all levels of the society from rich to poor as well as different economic activities in rural areas and the city, and offer glimpses of period clothing and architecture. The scroll is 25.5 centimetres (10.0 inches) in height and 5.25 meters (5.74 yards) long. In its length there are 814 humans (of whom only 20 are women), 28 boats, 60 animals, 30 buildings, 20 vehicles, 8 sedan chairs, and 170 trees. The countryside and the densely populated city are the two main sections in the picture, with the river meandering through the entire length.

. The original painting is the most celebrated work of art from the Song dynasty. Due to this high artistic reputation, it has inspired several works of art that revived and updated the style of the original. The version presented here was made by five Qing dynasty court painters (Chen Mu, Sun Hu, Jin Kun, Dai Hong and Cheng Zhidao) and presented to the Qianlong Emperor on January 15, 1737.

. There are many more people, over 4,000, in the Qing remake, which also is much larger (at 11 metres by 35 cm, or 37 ft by 1 ft). The full scroll should be viewed from right to left.


Editorial RM


Cod. da imagem: akg4566523
Crédito: Album / akg-images / Pictures From History/ Fotoarena

Direito Controlado


Cod. da imagem: akg4566523

Crédito: Album / akg-images / Pictures From History/ Fotoarena

'Along the River During the Qingming Festival' is a painting by the Song dynasty artist Zhang Zeduan (1085-1145). It captures the daily life of people and the landscape of the Northern Song capital, Bianjing, today's Kaifeng. The theme is said to celebrate the festive spirit and worldly commotion at the Qingming Festival, rather than the holiday's ceremonial aspects, such as tomb sweeping and prayers.

. Successive scenes reveal the lifestyle of all levels of the society from rich to poor as well as different economic activities in rural areas and the city, and offer glimpses of period clothing and architecture. The scroll is 25.5 centimetres (10.0 inches) in height and 5.25 meters (5.74 yards) long. In its length there are 814 humans (of whom only 20 are women), 28 boats, 60 animals, 30 buildings, 20 vehicles, 8 sedan chairs, and 170 trees. The countryside and the densely populated city are the two main sections in the picture, with the river meandering through the entire length.

. The original painting is celebrated as the most celebrated work of art from the Song dynasty.


Editorial RM


Cod. da imagem: akg3818591
Crédito: Album / akg-images / Pictures From History/ Fotoarena

Direito Controlado


Cod. da imagem: akg3818591

Crédito: Album / akg-images / Pictures From History/ Fotoarena

A pie represents 'Chine' (French for China) and is being divided between caricatures of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom, William II of Germany (who is squabbling with Queen Victoria over a borderland piece, whilst thrusting a knife into the pie to signify aggressive German intentions), Nicholas II of Russia, who is eyeing a particular piece, the French Marianne (who is diplomatically shown as not participating in the carving, and is depicted as close to Nicholas II, as a reminder of the Franco-Russian Alliance), and the Meiji Emperor of Japan, carefully contemplating which pieces to take.

. A stereotypical Qing official throws up his hands to try and stop them, but is powerless. It is meant to be a figurative representation of the Imperialist tendencies of these nations towards China during the decade.


Editorial RM


Cod. da imagem: akg3813802
Crédito: Album / akg-images / Pictures From History/ Fotoarena

Direito Controlado


Cod. da imagem: akg3813802

Crédito: Album / akg-images / Pictures From History/ Fotoarena

The Miao are a linguistically and culturally related group of people recognized by the government of the People's Republic of China as one of the 55 official minority groups.

. Miao is a Chinese term and does not reflect the self-designations of the component sub-groups, which include (with some variant spellings) Hmong, Hmu, A Hmao, and Kho (Qho) Xiong. The Miao live primarily in southern China, in the provinces of Guizhou, Hunan, Yunnan, Sichuan, Guangxi, Hainan, Guangdong, and Hubei.

. Some members of the Miao sub-groups, most notably Hmong people, have migrated out of China into Southeast Asia (northern Vietnam, Laos, Myanmar (Burma) and Thailand). Following the communist takeover of Laos in 1975, a large group of Hmong refugees resettled in several Western nations (United States, France, Australia, and elsewhere.).


Editorial RM


Cod. da imagem: akg3813809
Crédito: Album / akg-images / Pictures From History/ Fotoarena

Direito Controlado


Cod. da imagem: akg3813809

Crédito: Album / akg-images / Pictures From History/ Fotoarena

Wat Phan Tao, established in 1391, forms a kind of adjunct to the much larger Wat Chedi Luang lying next door and immediately to the south. Wat Phan Tao means 'Temple of a Thousand Furnaces' or 'Temple of a Thousand Kilns' and it is believed that the grounds were once the site of a foundry, casting bronze images of the Buddha for nearby Wat Chedi Luang.

. The wooden viharn is one of the few surviving all-wood temple buildings in Chiang Mai. In times past it was a secular structure of no religious significance, the ho kham or 'gilded hall' of Chao Mahawong, the 5th of the Chao Chet Ton monarchs, who ruled Chiang Mai and the north from 1846 to 1854.

. Chiang Mai (meaning 'new city'), sometimes written as 'Chiengmai' or 'Chiangmai', is the largest and most culturally significant city in northern Thailand. King Mengrai founded the city of Chiang Mai in 1296, and it succeeded Chiang Rai as capital of the Lanna kingdom.


Editorial RM


Cod. da imagem: akg3813806
Crédito: Album / akg-images / Pictures From History/ Fotoarena

Direito Controlado


Cod. da imagem: akg3813806

Crédito: Album / akg-images / Pictures From History/ Fotoarena

The lusheng (also spelled lu sheng; spelled qeej and pronounced gaeng in the Hmong language) is a Chinese musical instrument with multiple bamboo pipes, each fitted with a free reed, which are fitted into a long blowing tube made of hardwood. It most often has five or six pipes of different pitches, and is thus a polyphonic instrument. It comes in sizes ranging from very small to several meters in length.

. The Miao are a linguistically and culturally related group of people recognized by the government of the People's Republic of China as one of the 55 official minority groups.

. Miao is a Chinese term and does not reflect the self-designations of the component sub-groups, which include (with some variant spellings) Hmong, Hmu, A Hmao, and Kho (Qho) Xiong. The Miao live primarily in southern China, in the provinces of Guizhou, Hunan, Yunnan, Sichuan, Guangxi, Hainan, Guangdong, and Hubei.

. Some members of the Miao sub-groups, most notably Hmong people, have migrated out of China into Southeast Asia (northern Vietnam, Laos, Myanmar (Burma) and Thailand). Following the communist takeover of Laos in 1975, a large group of Hmong refugees resettled in several Western nations (United States, France, Australia, and elsewhere.).


Editorial RM


Cod. da imagem: akg3813800
Crédito: Album / akg-images / Pictures From History/ Fotoarena

Direito Controlado


Cod. da imagem: akg3813800

Crédito: Album / akg-images / Pictures From History/ Fotoarena

The Miao are a linguistically and culturally related group of people recognized by the government of the People's Republic of China as one of the 55 official minority groups.

. Miao is a Chinese term and does not reflect the self-designations of the component sub-groups, which include (with some variant spellings) Hmong, Hmu, A Hmao, and Kho (Qho) Xiong. The Miao live primarily in southern China, in the provinces of Guizhou, Hunan, Yunnan, Sichuan, Guangxi, Hainan, Guangdong, and Hubei.

. Some members of the Miao sub-groups, most notably Hmong people, have migrated out of China into Southeast Asia (northern Vietnam, Laos, Myanmar (Burma) and Thailand). Following the communist takeover of Laos in 1975, a large group of Hmong refugees resettled in several Western nations (United States, France, Australia, and elsewhere.).


Editorial RM


Cod. da imagem: akg3813804
Crédito: Album / akg-images / Pictures From History/ Fotoarena

Direito Controlado


Cod. da imagem: akg3813804

Crédito: Album / akg-images / Pictures From History/ Fotoarena

The Miao are a linguistically and culturally related group of people recognized by the government of the People's Republic of China as one of the 55 official minority groups.

. Miao is a Chinese term and does not reflect the self-designations of the component sub-groups, which include (with some variant spellings) Hmong, Hmu, A Hmao, and Kho (Qho) Xiong. The Miao live primarily in southern China, in the provinces of Guizhou, Hunan, Yunnan, Sichuan, Guangxi, Hainan, Guangdong, and Hubei.

. Some members of the Miao sub-groups, most notably Hmong people, have migrated out of China into Southeast Asia (northern Vietnam, Laos, Myanmar (Burma) and Thailand). Following the communist takeover of Laos in 1975, a large group of Hmong refugees resettled in several Western nations (United States, France, Australia, and elsewhere.).


Editorial RM


Cod. da imagem: akg3813807
Crédito: Album / akg-images / Pictures From History/ Fotoarena

Direito Controlado


Cod. da imagem: akg3813807

Crédito: Album / akg-images / Pictures From History/ Fotoarena

The lusheng (also spelled lu sheng; spelled qeej and pronounced gaeng in the Hmong language) is a Chinese musical instrument with multiple bamboo pipes, each fitted with a free reed, which are fitted into a long blowing tube made of hardwood. It most often has five or six pipes of different pitches, and is thus a polyphonic instrument. It comes in sizes ranging from very small to several meters in length.

. The Miao are a linguistically and culturally related group of people recognized by the government of the People's Republic of China as one of the 55 official minority groups.

. Miao is a Chinese term and does not reflect the self-designations of the component sub-groups, which include (with some variant spellings) Hmong, Hmu, A Hmao, and Kho (Qho) Xiong. The Miao live primarily in southern China, in the provinces of Guizhou, Hunan, Yunnan, Sichuan, Guangxi, Hainan, Guangdong, and Hubei.

. Some members of the Miao sub-groups, most notably Hmong people, have migrated out of China into Southeast Asia (northern Vietnam, Laos, Myanmar (Burma) and Thailand). Following the communist takeover of Laos in 1975, a large group of Hmong refugees resettled in several Western nations (United States, France, Australia, and elsewhere.).


Editorial RM


Cod. da imagem: akg3813808
Crédito: Album / akg-images / Pictures From History/ Fotoarena

Direito Controlado


Cod. da imagem: akg3813808

Crédito: Album / akg-images / Pictures From History/ Fotoarena

Wat Phan Tao, established in 1391, forms a kind of adjunct to the much larger Wat Chedi Luang lying next door and immediately to the south. Wat Phan Tao means 'Temple of a Thousand Furnaces' or 'Temple of a Thousand Kilns' and it is believed that the grounds were once the site of a foundry, casting bronze images of the Buddha for nearby Wat Chedi Luang.

. The wooden viharn is one of the few surviving all-wood temple buildings in Chiang Mai. In times past it was a secular structure of no religious significance, the ho kham or 'gilded hall' of Chao Mahawong, the 5th of the Chao Chet Ton monarchs, who ruled Chiang Mai and the north from 1846 to 1854.

. Chiang Mai (meaning 'new city'), sometimes written as 'Chiengmai' or 'Chiangmai', is the largest and most culturally significant city in northern Thailand. King Mengrai founded the city of Chiang Mai in 1296, and it succeeded Chiang Rai as capital of the Lanna kingdom.


Editorial RM


Cod. da imagem: akg3813805
Crédito: Album / akg-images / Pictures From History/ Fotoarena

Direito Controlado


Cod. da imagem: akg3813805

Crédito: Album / akg-images / Pictures From History/ Fotoarena

The Miao are a linguistically and culturally related group of people recognized by the government of the People's Republic of China as one of the 55 official minority groups.

. Miao is a Chinese term and does not reflect the self-designations of the component sub-groups, which include (with some variant spellings) Hmong, Hmu, A Hmao, and Kho (Qho) Xiong. The Miao live primarily in southern China, in the provinces of Guizhou, Hunan, Yunnan, Sichuan, Guangxi, Hainan, Guangdong, and Hubei.

. Some members of the Miao sub-groups, most notably Hmong people, have migrated out of China into Southeast Asia (northern Vietnam, Laos, Myanmar (Burma) and Thailand). Following the communist takeover of Laos in 1975, a large group of Hmong refugees resettled in several Western nations (United States, France, Australia, and elsewhere.).


Editorial RM


Cod. da imagem: akg3813801
Crédito: Album / akg-images / Pictures From History/ Fotoarena

Direito Controlado


Cod. da imagem: akg3813801

Crédito: Album / akg-images / Pictures From History/ Fotoarena

The Miao are a linguistically and culturally related group of people recognized by the government of the People's Republic of China as one of the 55 official minority groups.

. Miao is a Chinese term and does not reflect the self-designations of the component sub-groups, which include (with some variant spellings) Hmong, Hmu, A Hmao, and Kho (Qho) Xiong. The Miao live primarily in southern China, in the provinces of Guizhou, Hunan, Yunnan, Sichuan, Guangxi, Hainan, Guangdong, and Hubei.

. Some members of the Miao sub-groups, most notably Hmong people, have migrated out of China into Southeast Asia (northern Vietnam, Laos, Myanmar (Burma) and Thailand). Following the communist takeover of Laos in 1975, a large group of Hmong refugees resettled in several Western nations (United States, France, Australia, and elsewhere.).


Editorial RM


Cod. da imagem: akg3813803
Crédito: Album / akg-images / Pictures From History/ Fotoarena

Direito Controlado


Cod. da imagem: akg3813803

Crédito: Album / akg-images / Pictures From History/ Fotoarena

The Miao are a linguistically and culturally related group of people recognized by the government of the People's Republic of China as one of the 55 official minority groups.

. Miao is a Chinese term and does not reflect the self-designations of the component sub-groups, which include (with some variant spellings) Hmong, Hmu, A Hmao, and Kho (Qho) Xiong. The Miao live primarily in southern China, in the provinces of Guizhou, Hunan, Yunnan, Sichuan, Guangxi, Hainan, Guangdong, and Hubei.

. Some members of the Miao sub-groups, most notably Hmong people, have migrated out of China into Southeast Asia (northern Vietnam, Laos, Myanmar (Burma) and Thailand). Following the communist takeover of Laos in 1975, a large group of Hmong refugees resettled in several Western nations (United States, France, Australia, and elsewhere.).


Editorial RM


Cod. da imagem: akg3813794
Crédito: Album / akg-images / Pictures From History/ Fotoarena

Direito Controlado


Cod. da imagem: akg3813794

Crédito: Album / akg-images / Pictures From History/ Fotoarena

Phowintaung (also variously romanised as Hpowindaung, Powintaung, Po Win Taung) is a Buddhist cave complex located approximately 25 kilometers west of Monywa and 10 kilometers southeast of Yinmabin, in Yinmabin Township, Monywa District, Sagaing Region, Northern Burma (Myanmar). It is located on the western bank of the Chindwin River.

. The name of the complex means 'Mountain of Isolated Solitary Meditation'. The complex contains 947 small and large richly decorated caves. It is carved into a sandstone outcrop and contains numerous carved Buddha statues and mural paintings of geometric patterns and Jataka stories. The statues and paintings have been dated to between the 14th and 18th centuries.


Editorial RM


Cod. da imagem: akg3813784
Crédito: Album / akg-images / Pictures From History/ Fotoarena

Direito Controlado


Cod. da imagem: akg3813784

Crédito: Album / akg-images / Pictures From History/ Fotoarena

The Miao are a linguistically and culturally related group of people recognized by the government of the People's Republic of China as one of the 55 official minority groups.

. Miao is a Chinese term and does not reflect the self-designations of the component sub-groups, which include (with some variant spellings) Hmong, Hmu, A Hmao, and Kho (Qho) Xiong. The Miao live primarily in southern China, in the provinces of Guizhou, Hunan, Yunnan, Sichuan, Guangxi, Hainan, Guangdong, and Hubei.

. Some members of the Miao sub-groups, most notably Hmong people, have migrated out of China into Southeast Asia (northern Vietnam, Laos, Myanmar (Burma) and Thailand). Following the communist takeover of Laos in 1975, a large group of Hmong refugees resettled in several Western nations (United States, France, Australia, and elsewhere.).


Editorial RM


Cod. da imagem: akg3813787
Crédito: Album / akg-images / Pictures From History/ Fotoarena

Direito Controlado


Cod. da imagem: akg3813787

Crédito: Album / akg-images / Pictures From History/ Fotoarena

The Miao are a linguistically and culturally related group of people recognized by the government of the People's Republic of China as one of the 55 official minority groups.

. Miao is a Chinese term and does not reflect the self-designations of the component sub-groups, which include (with some variant spellings) Hmong, Hmu, A Hmao, and Kho (Qho) Xiong. The Miao live primarily in southern China, in the provinces of Guizhou, Hunan, Yunnan, Sichuan, Guangxi, Hainan, Guangdong, and Hubei.

. Some members of the Miao sub-groups, most notably Hmong people, have migrated out of China into Southeast Asia (northern Vietnam, Laos, Myanmar (Burma) and Thailand). Following the communist takeover of Laos in 1975, a large group of Hmong refugees resettled in several Western nations (United States, France, Australia, and elsewhere.).


Editorial RM


Cod. da imagem: akg3813798
Crédito: Album / akg-images / Pictures From History/ Fotoarena

Direito Controlado


Cod. da imagem: akg3813798

Crédito: Album / akg-images / Pictures From History/ Fotoarena

The Miao are a linguistically and culturally related group of people recognized by the government of the People's Republic of China as one of the 55 official minority groups.

. Miao is a Chinese term and does not reflect the self-designations of the component sub-groups, which include (with some variant spellings) Hmong, Hmu, A Hmao, and Kho (Qho) Xiong. The Miao live primarily in southern China, in the provinces of Guizhou, Hunan, Yunnan, Sichuan, Guangxi, Hainan, Guangdong, and Hubei.

. Some members of the Miao sub-groups, most notably Hmong people, have migrated out of China into Southeast Asia (northern Vietnam, Laos, Myanmar (Burma) and Thailand). Following the communist takeover of Laos in 1975, a large group of Hmong refugees resettled in several Western nations (United States, France, Australia, and elsewhere.).


Editorial RM


Cod. da imagem: akg3813799
Crédito: Album / akg-images / Pictures From History/ Fotoarena

Direito Controlado


Cod. da imagem: akg3813799

Crédito: Album / akg-images / Pictures From History/ Fotoarena

The Miao are a linguistically and culturally related group of people recognized by the government of the People's Republic of China as one of the 55 official minority groups.

. Miao is a Chinese term and does not reflect the self-designations of the component sub-groups, which include (with some variant spellings) Hmong, Hmu, A Hmao, and Kho (Qho) Xiong. The Miao live primarily in southern China, in the provinces of Guizhou, Hunan, Yunnan, Sichuan, Guangxi, Hainan, Guangdong, and Hubei.

. Some members of the Miao sub-groups, most notably Hmong people, have migrated out of China into Southeast Asia (northern Vietnam, Laos, Myanmar (Burma) and Thailand). Following the communist takeover of Laos in 1975, a large group of Hmong refugees resettled in several Western nations (United States, France, Australia, and elsewhere.).


Editorial RM


Cod. da imagem: akg3813791
Crédito: Album / akg-images / Pictures From History/ Fotoarena

Direito Controlado


Cod. da imagem: akg3813791

Crédito: Album / akg-images / Pictures From History/ Fotoarena

'A woongee or member of the chief council and his wife in their dress of ceremony', from Michael Symes, 'An Accouint of the Embassy to the Kingdom of Ava, sent by the Governor-General of India in the year 1795'. A 'woongee' (wungyi) held the rank of minister.

Editorial RM
 
 
  < Anterior
 
HOME    |    ENTRE EM CONTATO    |    TERMO DE USO       

COPYRIGHT 2008-2018 FOTOARENA. PROIBIDA A CÓPIA OU REPRODUÇÃO SEM AUTORIZAÇÃO PRÉVIA..